Women’s Basketball Looks Forward to Upcoming Season

Women’s Basketball Looks Forward to Upcoming Season

By Kaitlyn York Contributing Writer

 

Paige Carter (40) goes up for a jump ball to start off the game. (Photo by Jeff Lamb Photography)The Women’s Basketball team at UMF, buzzing with excitement and aspiration, has been working hard to prepare this year’s team for the upcoming season.

   Head Coach Jamie Beaudoin shares his enthusiasm about a new year and new challenges. Beaudoin has always enjoyed the aspect of teaching the game of basketball to his players, with the ultimate goal of seeing their growth throughout the season.

   Beaudoin recognizes that every year is different, though, and this year there are some major changes to the North Atlantic Conference (NAC).

   “Our conference will be a little bit different,” said Beaudoin. “We lost four schools from a year ago, but we gained two others so our schedule will be much different, both conference and non-conference, because we’ve had to find some additional games.” He believes that the changes will make the team face unexpected, but exciting experiences.

   “I think this season will be a lot better than last year. Last year we won 7 games,” said Sara Lamb, a junior on the team. “Overall I’m excited and I am hopeful to have a good season.”

  Paige Carter, a senior at UMF and fourth year member of the team, believes that the new additions to the conference will be interesting, but she is excited to see what the future holds. “I am most looking forward to playing against and traveling to several different schools that we have never faced before, in my four years here,” said Carter.

   This year, Carter also has the unique experience of balancing student teaching and playing basketball. It can be a struggle at times because of late night practices and early school days.

  “Both are major time commitments but being a student-athlete at UMF has been a very rewarding experience that I wouldn’t ever change,” said Carter. “I have a lot of support from my coach, team, mentor and my students.”

  Carter began playing for the Women’s Basketball team her freshman year at UMF, and though she is excited for her future career as a teacher,  she will miss playing for the Lady Beavers.

   “It sounds very cliche but these past four years have really flown by. I am so excited to see what the future holds for me, but will be sad to be leaving UMF and the family I have made here,” said Carter, “Being a part of the women’s basketball team has allowed me to be a part of something greater than myself.”

  The Women’s Basketball team is also focuses on helping outside organizations through fundraisers during season. They will be participating in games for breast cancer awareness, as well as participating in We Back Pat, which is in memory of Pat Summitt, the University of Tennessee women’s basketball team head coach, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. The Lady Beavers also participate in Go Red for Women, which raises awareness about heart disease in women.

  As well as fundraising for outside organizations, they will be selling their Finals Survival Kits and Beaver Socks. The money from these fundraisers will go towards for the teams t-shirts, for 3-point give ways, practice gear, equipment and the software to break down game film.

  The teams first home game of the season will be Nov. 13th at 5:30 p.m., followed by the Men’s Basketball team at 7:30 p.m. against the University of Maine at Machias in Dearborn Gymnasium.

UMF Field Hockey Falls Short to Thomas Terriers

UMF Field Hockey Falls Short to Thomas Terriers

Emily Corbett dribbles the ball up field. (Photo courtesy of Kaitlyn York)

By Kaitlyn York Contributing Writer

The UMF Field Hockey team recently battled the Thomas Terriers in a regular season game that resulted in a 3-0 loss.

  It was a brisk and windy morning, though that didn’t slow down the Beavers as they warmed up for the game. The team had practiced especially hard in preparation for facing the Terriers, knowing they needed the win to help to their record.

  “We played a very good first half Saturday but unfortunately fell behind 1-0 by giving up a goal late in the half. In the second half we pressed a little too hard and the game got away from us,” said head coach, Cyndi Pratt, in an email interview. “It was a case of wanting something so bad and trying so hard that we played a little to tense and uptight.”

  The Beavers work

UMF’s field hockey team stands at the begining of the game.(Photo courtesy of Kaitlyn York)

ed hard  both offensively and defensively to hold off the Terriers for the first 22 minutes of the game.

  Senior team captain, Torrie Nightingale, lead the team down the field numerous times in the first half and was just short of scoring a goal. “We were close during the first half and we were down there the whole time, in position,” said Nightingale.

  Both teams came back with a bang at the beginning of the second half, each pushing harder than before on an offensive push. The Terriers scored another goal just three minutes into the second half putting them ahead 2-0. In an effort to get the game back, the Beavers pushed extremely hard to keep the ball on their offensive side of the field.

  “We really connected on our passes and we worked well down the middle of the field and on the outside, so we just need to be able to finish” said senior, Gabriella Winslow. “We definitely need to be able to score some goals and out beat the opponent.”

  In the last few seconds of the game, the Terriers scored their third and final goal determining the fate of the game.

  “I think we played really well as a team, we just didn’t finish what we needed to,” said Nightingale, “we were the better team today, the score board just didn’t reflect that.”

  “The Field Hockey program has a long history of success and tradition. Players in our program are hard working and committed to doing their very best each and every day,” Pratt said. “This year’s team is no different, we have a strong group of senior leaders and the underclassman are working hard and improving everyday.”

  Pratt stated this years team lacks some playing experience at the collegiate level though she hopes that the regular season games will give them the experience that they need to be able to improve and win before playoffs. The team has seven more games in the regular season before they begin their journey into the playoffs.

  “This team has a lot of character and toughness and they will keep working hard and competing to the best of their ability each and every game.” said Pratt.

Big Red’s Army Crowned New Intramural Volleyball Champions

Big Red’s Army Crowned New Intramural Volleyball Champions

By Jared Smelter Contributing Writer

Big Red’s Army wearing their Championship t-shirts. (L to R, back to front): Leah Waggoner, Kyler Chabe, John Hamilton, Hunter Wiley, Maegan Hewey, Abby Shields, captian Caleb Grover and J.P. Tshamala
(Photo courtesy of UMF Intramurals Facebook)

Big Red’s Army, one of the ten intramural volleyball teams in this year’s intramural volleyball league at UMF, defeated Rolling Thunder in the championship game last week.

   “I think as a team we just had really good chemistry and we all understood our roles,” said Caleb Grover, captain of Big Red’s Army.

   The team went undefeated in the regular season, taking down all the opponents they faced. In week one, they won against Rolling Thunder, who they eventually played in the championship, captained by Matthew Dotson. In the last game of the regular season, they defeated Slobbest Knobbest for the second time.

   But doing well in the regular season was not Big Red’s Army’s goal. They wanted to win it all. After falling short last year, team member Hunter Wiley wanted redemption. So Grover took the essential pieces of his team, including UMF juniors Wiley and Kyle Chabe and tried to assemble a squad that could conquer the league.

   J.P. Tshamala, one of the free agents entering the volleyball season, received an offer from Grover and his comrades to join the team. “I am friends with the people on the team and they asked me to join so I accepted their offer,” Tshamala said.

   Entering the regular season, Big Red’s Army had one goal in mind: getting to the championship and winning. They took the league by storm and qualified for the playoffs.

   “The only two teams that presented us with any adversity were Rolling Thunder and Spiked Seltzer,” Grover said. “[They were] definitely the hardest team we faced, they had a lot of athleticism and height.”

   Other than those obstacles, Big Red’s Army made it to the playoffs pretty easily, according to Grover. The team was very successful because of their best player, Chabe, according to multiple team members including Maeghan Hewey, Hunter Wiley, and Captain Grover.

   “Kyle Chabe was our best player so we played around him,” Grover said. “We consistently were successful with the bump, set, spike giving us a strategic advantage over the other teams.”

   In the first round, they defeated Honey Roasted Hens to move on to the semifinals, where they took down The Potato Spikers.

   They advanced into the finals to play Rolling Thunder, who was one of their toughest opponents during the regular season. When the team scored match point, there was nothing but jubilation on the court.

   “It was great winning, the team that I was on was amazing; everyone was really good, and made me feel welcome,” Tshamala said.

   Grover’s team will be looking to defend their intramural volleyball title next fall when new teams and old ones will be looking to dethrone them.

   If you are looking to join an intramural sports team, contact leah.brackett@maine.edu, or message the UMF Intramural Sports facebook page.

UMF Partners with Titcomb for Bike Race and Trail Run

By Evan Gorr Contributing Writer

The UMF snowsports team is joining forces with Titcomb Mountain to host their 3rd annual mountain bike race and trail run on October 21st. The proceeds will benefit both the Snowsports team and Titcomb Mountain.

   The event will be held at Titcomb Mountain in Farmington, with the 1K and 5k trail runs  starting at 9:30 a.m. These will be followed by the kids mountain bike race at 10:30 a.m., and the rest of the bike racers will leave at 11:30 a.m. The cost of registration varies from $10 – $50 depending on the race you choose.

   Jedediah Stevens, an alpine ski racer and member of the Snowsports team, is glad to volunteer at the event. “I think it’s an excellent fundraiser for us, it lets us give back to the community and put on a fun event,” Stevens said.

   According to Stevens, last year there were around 40 participants who raised $1500 dollars. Stevens wants to see greater participation this year, and notes that you don’t have to be competitive to participate. “This event is as competitive or relaxed as you want it to be,” said Stevens.

   Anyone can register for either the trail run or the bike race, and there are different distances and categories depending on your age and ability.

   Scott Hoisington, the director of Snowsports at UMF, speaks highly of the event, and enjoys this type of fundraiser. “This is a great event that puts you outside in the foliage in an athletic environment,” Hoisington said. “We do it to support Titcomb and it also matches our style of athletic adventure.”

   Hoisington notes that there are incentives to participate in the event. “The first 60 registrants will get a free tee shirt,” Hoisington said, “and we have a few sponsors that will be handing out some prizes.”

   Seth Noonkester, the General Manager of Titcomb, is excited for the event, and is happy to support a fundraiser that benefits the Snowsports team, as well as the mountain. “To me, September and October are the best times to ride in our area,” Noonkester said. “The temperatures are a little cooler and the foliage is peaking.”

   Noonkester wants more UMF students to experience Titcomb this fall and winter. “I welcome all UMF students to come check us out,” Noonkester said. “I guarantee after your first visit that you’ll fall in love with the place.”

   The trails at Titcomb are starting to become more well known across the state, and Noonkester believes that there is a reason for this. “Titcomb mountain is the best because of the people and community that utilize it and bring the place to life!” The event is put together by the community surrounding Titcomb, but it attracts people from all parts of the Maine.

   Noonkester notes that UMF students are eligible for a free ski pass, and there are many events planned throughout the winter.  There are also incentives for runners to check out the mountain. UMF Alumni and Salomon shoe rep, Bill Asbell, will be there with trail running footwear for people to demo.

UMF Men’s Soccer Falls to the Mariners of Maine Maritime Academy

UMF Men’s Soccer Falls to the Mariners of Maine Maritime Academy

By Emilee Eustis Staff Reporter

The crowd was buzzing with excitement under the beaming sun while waiting for the UMF men’s soccer team to take the field last Saturday morning.

UMF men’s soccer team huddled up and planing their next move on the field. (Photo courtesy of UMF Athletics)

    It was the season opener, or first conference game, for the Beavers and they were facing one of their rivals, the Mariners of Maine Maritime Academy (MMA). “We knew it was going to be a fight for 90 minutes and that this game goes a long way towards playoff standings at the end of the season,” said Tristan Price, a senior athlete at UMF. “Everyone was really excited and looking forward to the game.”

   The Beavers spent two practices preparing for the challenge and focused on capitalizing on every chance they had. “We always talk about coming out of the kickoff strong and putting the other team under pressure immediately and we were able to do that,” said Price. After scoring their first goal within minutes of the game, the team was focused on not letting the Mariners offensive push take away their quick lead.

   The Beavers showed a strong defensive effort, keeping the Mariners at one goal until the last seven minutes of the half when Matt Caron of MMA scored on a penalty goal. The momentum swung in the Mariners favor, and with a tied score at halftime, the Beavers were prepared for an intense start of the second half.

    “[At halftime] we talked about getting the ball more wide to create more chances,” said Michael Pingree, another captain and senior athlete at UMF. “We wanted to work smarter off the ball.”

   The second half started out at a fast pace with both teams focused on an offensive push. At the 25-minute mark, the Mariners used that energy to get another goal, again by Caron, putting them ahead 2 to 1.

    “I think their goal in the second half kind of changed everything,” said Price. “We started throwing guys forward trying to score and we abandoned our game plan towards the end.”

   In an effort to get the game back in their hands, the Beavers worked extremely hard to keep the ball on our end of the field. “With about 15 minutes left, we missed a good opportunity on net that helped shift momentum our way,” said Pingree. “From that point on we got some dangerous balls in and created many good opportunities to even the score.”

   With seconds left, they had one last chance to tie the game. “Time was running down and the urgency to score was full throttle,” said Pingree. The ball reached Jake Heimlich, a Junior at UMF, and flew into the back of the net as the time ran out. The team “plead” for a penalty as one of their players was on the ground, but the referee did not agree.

   The final score was 2 to 1 in favor of the Mariners, but the outcome did not discourage the Beavers. “We work extremely hard every day,” said Pingree. “We’re just looking to stay disciplined in our overall game plan, and that will make us really hard to beat.”

Insight into Women’s Rugby with Captain Erin Buckland

Insight into Women’s Rugby with Captain Erin Buckland

By Journey Bubar Contributing Writer

Buckland has been playing on the Women’s Rugby team since freshman year at UMF and is looking forward to another promising season with her teammates.

   Since Women’s Rugby is a club sport, they usually don’t have enough players to fill the 15 field positions, but this year Buckland is happy to see a large number

The women’s Rugby team engages in a scrum. (Photo courtesy of Erin Buckland)

of new recruits. “Sometimes we wouldn’t have any subs, so by the end of the 80-minute game, we’d only have 13 players left on the field,” said Buckland.

   Buckland mentioned that new players aren’t expected to know everything about the game, and that the coaches and fellow players are happy to teach the rookies everything they need to know. “If you put the time and work in, everyone can do it. That’s the thing about rugby, it’s a really easy game to fall in love with,” said Buckland.

  Buckland explained that having rugby be a club sport presents some challenges. “I think that we’re sometimes looked at and treated differently for being a club sport,” Buckland said. “It’s hard to recruit varsity athletes because they want to stick with the level they’re playing at, so they don’t even take a look at rugby which is sad, because they should.”

   Another challenge the team faces is that the UMF Fleet doesn’t always have enough passenger vans to fulfill the demand between clubs and other sports teams, even when filing the van application on time. “I don’t know the official order, but I know that club sports are last,” Buckland said.

   Buckland explained that without consistent access to UMF vans, the team has had to rent passenger vans from a third-party which costs more, or they have to their personal cars certified so they can drive to their games.

  Buckland explained how every position and player is vital to the game, and how people should give rugby a chance even if they aren’t sure about it. “Since it’s a team sport, every single person needs to be doing their job or we’re not going to succeed,” said Buckland.

  Before their Saturday games, the team likes to have a Friday night dinner to prepare and bond. “We always try to have a rugby game playing in the background,” said Buckland. “It helps the rookies know what to expect.”

  Practicing is also really important before big games. They warm up, do some drills, and scrimmage each other just like every other sport. But the team really focuses on building communication. “Everything you do in rugby requires communication,” said Buckland.

  Buckland admitted that she still feels a little bit nervous before a game, even after playing for so long. “The previous captain said something that really stuck with me,” said Buckland. “She was like, ‘You have to go out and you have to want it the most.’ And honestly, if you do want it the most, the nerves just go away.”

“So even if I get my van request in on time, if academics or varsity sports wants the vans, they’ll take the Women’s Rugby vans away for them to have.”

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